The theme for the second week was ’10 seconds’. This at first thought seemed challenging, but what helped was the ambiguity. It never specified any form of gameplay or even concept. Mechanics wise I could make a game that lasts for 10 seconds, quite obvious, but it did not feel powerful enough or long enough to experiment within. And this was an opportunity to experiment, who knows how many more of those I’m going to get.

I love narrative games, just as much as I love strategy games. But 10 second narratives have already been done before,

Queers in Love at the End of the World, Anna Anthropy 2013

So I decided to create a narrative game, that doesn’t play like a narrative game. Sort of like a breaking the fourth wall playing with your preconceived gameplay exceptions kind of a game. Ok, I am kind of gold plating a copper ring here, and honestly I wasn’t even aware of what exactly I was doing when I was making the game. A lot of it became clearer after the fact.

The Quiz

But where’s the ’10 seconds’? you say, well I did not forget about that. I made it a timed quiz, 10 seconds to answer each question.

At first I decided to make a multiple choice kind of a quiz but that made it quite difficult to keep track of all the different narrative branching. With games like these just a couple of variants and it all multiplies into enormous branching narratives. I knew what kind of experience I wanted to create, it was simple really. It starts out as a normal quiz, then it asks questions with no right answers, then it responds accordingly to your previous choices and always ends with the same message. For this I realised I did not really need branching narratives, so I kept it simple by making them all ‘Yes or No’ questions. This allowed me to implement all the ingredients I had hoped to implement while keeping it achievable in under a week’s time of development.